Best Books: Margot

Margot
Margot, Class of 2021, has seven books she considers her best reads, including Out of the Easy by Ruta Sepetys. Here’s her take on them:

Lily and the Octopus by Stephen Rowley: “It was a really moving story that I thoroughly enjoyed for its emotional value and strong statement on the fragility of life.”

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas: “This book (or maybe The Help) is probably my favorite–it makes you think about an issue that is very prominent today, and addresses multiple facets of the issue, which is racism and police brutality.”

Ruta Sepetys’ novels Salt to the Sea, Out of the Easy, and Between Shades of Gray: “I really love historical fiction, and these three are excellent historical fiction novels that one can relate to the characters.”

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi: “This is an excellent memoir that makes you think about the vulnerability of life, and how one life affects others. This book made me cry.”

The Help by Kathryn Stockett: “Highly acclaimed for good reason, this is another excellent historical fiction story that is enjoyable to read and hard to put down. The multiple points of view keep the story moving, and it relays information, even though it’s through a fictional outlet.”

Click on the book titles to learn more about Margot’s fav books on Goodreads.com.

If You Liked The Book Thief, Try…Why?

Let’s get one thing clear–there are no books like The Book Thief.

Death is the perfect narrator, Lisel is an amazing heroine, and her story is unlike any other. But there are other phenomenal, engrossing books out there you’ll like if you enjoyed The Book Thief.

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

Oct. 11th, 1943-A British spy plane crashes in Nazi-occupied France. Its pilot and passenger are best friends. One of the girls has a chance at survival. The other has lost the game before it’s barely begun.

When “Verity” is arrested by the Gestapo, she’s sure she doesn’t stand a chance. As a secret agent captured in enemy territory, she’s living a spy’s worst nightmare. Her Nazi interrogators give her a simple choice: reveal her mission or face a grisly execution.

As she intricately weaves her confession, Verity uncovers her past, how she became friends with the pilot Maddie, and why she left Maddie in the wrecked fuselage of their plane. On each new scrap of paper, Verity battles for her life, confronting her views on courage, failure and her desperate hope to make it home. But will trading her secrets be enough to save her from the enemy?

A Michael L. Printz Award Honor book that was called “a fiendishly-plotted mind game of a novel” in The New York Times, Code Name Verity is a visceral read of danger, resolve, and survival that shows just how far true friends will go to save each other.

WHY? Verity will do anything to keep from being tortured–hand over classified information, reveal military depots, crack codes, but first she has to explain how she got into the service, and that means talking about her best friend Maddie and that means buying time. This story is all intricate plot, trembling emotions, and best friends, with the same WWII backdrop as The Book Thief. 

Jellicoe Road by Malina Marchetta

I’m dreaming of the boy in the tree. I tell him stories. About the Jellicoe School and the Townies and the Cadets from a school in Sydney. I tell him about the war between us for territory. And I tell him about Hannah, who lives in the unfinished house by the river. Hannah, who is too young to be hiding away from the world. Hannah, who found me on the Jellicoe Road six years ago.

Taylor is leader of the boarders at the Jellicoe School. She has to keep the upper hand in the territory wars and deal with Jonah Griggs – the enigmatic leader of the cadets, and someone she thought she would never see again.

And now Hannah, the person Taylor had come to rely on, has disappeared. Taylor’s only clue is a manuscript about five kids who lived in Jellicoe eighteen years ago. She needs to find out more, but this means confronting her own story, making sense of her strange, recurring dream, and finding her mother – who abandoned her on the Jellicoe Road.

WHY? This novel is brilliantly compelling, with characters you can love and hate from all different perspectives and a mystery that weaves everything together. Taylor’s narrative isn’t as peaceful as Death’s, but her voice will strike you just the same. Continue reading

The 2015 Abraham Lincoln High School Book Award Nominees

High schoolers across Illinois voted, and the results are in! Encompassing all subgenres of Young Adult, these are what you declared to be the best books of the year.

The nominees for next year’s Abe Lincoln Book Award are…

WINGER by Andrew Smith

Ryan Dean West is a fourteen-year-old junior at a boarding school for rich kids in the Pacific Northwest. He’s living in Opportunity Hall, the dorm for troublemakers, and rooming with the biggest bully on the rugby team. And he’s madly in love with his best friend Annie, who thinks of him as a little boy.

With the help of his sense of humor, rugby buddies, and his penchant for doodling comics, Ryan Dean manages to survive life’s complications and even find some happiness along the way. But when the unthinkable happens, he has to figure out how to hold on to what’s important, even when it feels like everything has fallen apart.

Filled with hand-drawn info-graphics and illustrations and told in a pitch-perfect voice, this realistic depiction of a teen’s experience strikes an exceptional balance of hilarious and heartbreaking.

THE BEGINNING OF EVERYTHING by Robyn Schneider

Golden boy Ezra Faulkner believes everyone has a tragedy waiting for them—a single encounter after which everything that really matters will happen. His particular tragedy waited until he was primed to lose it all: in one spectacular night, a reckless driver shatters Ezra’s knee, his athletic career, and his social life.

No longer a front-runner for Homecoming King, Ezra finds himself at the table of misfits, where he encounters new girl Cassidy Thorpe. Cassidy is unlike anyone Ezra’s ever met, achingly effortless, fiercely intelligent, and determined to bring Ezra along on her endless adventures.

But as Ezra dives into his new studies, new friendships, and new love, he learns that some people, like books, are easy to misread. And now he must consider: if one’s singular tragedy has already hit and everything after it has mattered quite a bit, what happens when more misfortune strikes?

Robyn Schneider’s The Beginning of Everything is a lyrical, witty, and heart-wrenching novel about how difficult it is to play the part that people expect, and how new beginnings can stem from abrupt and tragic endings.

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Hidden Gems: Historicals

Some people wish they were born in another century–personally, I’d miss indoor plumbing. Until we develop time travel, books can take us through time anywhere we want.

We’ve picked some amazing historicals for this Hidden Gems segment! From the rise of Genghis Khan to nun assassins to thrilling WWII stories, this book list covers almost everything.

TEMPLAR by Jordan Mechner, Illustrated by LeUyen Pham & Alex Puvilland

Martin is one of a handful of Templar Knights to escape when the king of France and the pope conspire to destroy the noble order. The pope and king aim to frame the Templars for heresy, execute all of them, and make off with their legendary treasure. That’s the plan, anyway, but Martin and several other surviving knights mount a counter-campaign to regain the lost treasure of the Knights Templar.

 

Fall of Giants (The Century Trilogy, #1) by Ken Follett

A thirteen-year-old Welsh boy enters a man’s world in the mining pits; an American law student rejected by love finds a surprising new career in Woodrow Wilson’s White House; a housekeeper for the aristocratic Fitzherberts takes a fateful step above her station, while Lady Maud Fitzherbert herself crosses deep into forbidden territory when she falls in love with a German spy; and two orphaned Russian brothers embark on radically different paths when their plan to emigrate to America falls afoul of war, conscription, and revolution.

From the dirt and danger of a coal mine to the glittering chandeliers of a palace, from the corridors of power to the bedrooms of the mighty, Fall of Giants takes readers into the inextricably entangled fates of five families-and into a century that we thought we knew, but that now will never seem the same again.

SCARLET (SCARLET, #1) by A.C. Gaughen

Many readers know the tale of Robin Hood, but they will be swept away by this new version full of action, secrets, and romance.

Posing as one of Robin Hood’s thieves to avoid the wrath of the evil Thief Taker Lord Gisbourne, Scarlet has kept her identity secret from all of Nottinghamshire. Only the Hood and his band know the truth: the agile thief posing as a whip of a boy is actually a fearless young woman with a secret past. Helping the people of Nottingham outwit the corrupt Sheriff of Nottingham could cost Scarlet her life as Gisbourne closes in.

It’s only her fierce loyalty to Robin—whose quick smiles and sharp temper have the rare power to unsettle her—that keeps Scarlet going and makes this fight worth dying for.

Grave Mercy (His Fair Assassins, #1) by Robin LaFevers

Why be the sheep, when you can be the wolf?

Seventeen-year-old Ismae escapes from the brutality of an arranged marriage into the sanctuary of the convent of St. Mortain, where the sisters still serve the gods of old. Here she learns that the god of Death Himself has blessed her with dangerous gifts—and a violent destiny. If she chooses to stay at the convent, she will be trained as an assassin and serve as a handmaiden to Death. To claim her new life, she must destroy the lives of others.

Ismae’s most important assignment takes her straight into the high court of Brittany—where she finds herself woefully under prepared—not only for the deadly games of intrigue and treason, but for the impossible choices she must make. For how can she deliver Death’s vengeance upon a target who, against her will, has stolen her heart?

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